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Digitization Projects at UNLV Libraries

New Hybrid Publication: Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries

By Cory Lampert on January 25, 2008 3:31 PM | Permalink
pgraphic1-2497.jpg About a year ago I observed a group of New Media researchers from a variety of disciplines, including the UNLV School of Journalism, who came together to research the Consumer Electronics show, trade shows, and technology through a variety of academic disciplines. These scholars, working with the Center for History and New Media proposed an interesting methodology of "swarm" scholarship (spontaneous, "in the moment", data collection) combined with a hybrid publication of both a monograph and an evolving digital component (a wiki) to complement the content. This was the first time I was introduced to the idea, and shortly thereafter I was asked to collaborate with some of my UNLV colleagues on a book chapter for Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries using many of the same techniques.

New Hybrid Publication: Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries

By Cory Lampert on January 25, 2008 3:31 PM | Permalink
pgraphic1-2497.jpg About a year ago, I had the pleasure to observe and work with a group of new media researchers from a variety of disciplines, including the UNLV Journalism School, who came together to research the Consumer Electronics show, trade shoes/conventions, and technology. These scholars had proposed an interesting methodology of "swarm" scholarship (spontaneous, "in the moment", data collection) combined with a hybrid publication of a monograph and an evolving digital component (a wiki) to complement the content. This was the first time I was introduced to the idea, and shortly thereafter I was asked to collaborate with some of my UNLV colleagues on a book chapter for Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries using many of the same techniques.

New Hybrid Publication: Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries

By Cory Lampert on January 25, 2008 3:06 PM | Permalink
About a year ago, I had the pleasure to observe and work with a group of new media researchers from a variety of disciplines, including the UNLV Journalism School, who came together to research the Consumer Electronics show, trade shoes/conventions, and technology. These scholars had proposed an interesting methodology of "swarm" scholarship (spontaneous, "in the moment", data collection) combined with a hybrid publication of a monograph and an evolving digital component (a wiki) to complement the content. This was the first time I was introduced to the idea, and shortly thereafter I was asked to collaborate with some of my UNLV colleagues on a book chapter for Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries using many of the same techniques.

Attention LIS Students!

By Cory Lampert on January 24, 2008 2:31 PM | Permalink
I am a member of the ALA New Members Roundtable Student Chapter of the Year Award and I am trying to get the word out about this award. Please forward to any interested students you might know. Thanks! Applicants Sought for the NMRT Student Chapter of the Year Award Deadline: February 29, 2008 Calling All Student Chapters! Has your chapter had an outstanding year? Has membership in your chapter increased? Did your chapter develop and provide opportunities for members to participate in interesting and rewarding activities? Has your chapter received any awards? Do you have outstanding officers or members who should be recognized nationally?

Library of Congress Images on Flickr

By Cory Lampert on January 17, 2008 10:50 AM | Permalink
One of my co-workers sent me an e-mail about this project and I think it is a really interesting experiment showing how the general public interacts with image collections in what they perceive as a non-library environment. To start you may want to visit the collection and browse around. The LOC has also posted a good FAQ list that covers a lot of what I wanted to know when I heard about the project. It is pretty amazing to read the extensive comments, explore the tagging going on (lots of international users!) and see how users are enthusiastically interacting with the collections. What do you think? Should we do this with some of our institution's lesser-described and popular collections? Are any of your digital collections in Flickr?