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las vegas

Updated: 4 Nevada Casino Employment reports

By David G. Schwartz on February 5, 2015 10:28 AM | Permalink

Now updated with fiscal 2014 data, courtesy of student assistant John Nguyen:

Nevada Statewide Casino Employment 
Productivity, Revenues, and Payroll: A Statistical Study, 1990-2014

Las Vegas Strip Casino Employment 
Productivity, Revenues, and Payroll: A Statistical Study, 1990-2014

Boulder Strip Casino Employment 
Productivity, Revenues, and Payroll: A Statistical Study, 1990-2014

Reno/Sparks Casino Employment
Productivity, Revenues, and Payroll: A Statistical Study, 1990-2014

3 New/Updated Reports on Big Las Vegas Strip Casinos

By David G. Schwartz on January 14, 2015 3:57 PM | Permalink

These three reports show the historical trends and current reality of the "average" big Las Vegas Strip casino:

Trends for Big Las Vegas Strip Casinos, 2008-2014
The “Average Big Strip Casino” reports for their respective years give snapshots of how Las Vegas casinos earning over $72 million a year in gaming revenue are performing. This report shows how revenues and expenses have tracked over time.

Trends for Big Las Vegas Strip Casinos, 2005-2011
The “Average Big Strip Casino” reports for their respective years give snapshots of how Las Vegas casinos earning over $72 million a year in gaming revenue are performing. This report shows how revenues and expenses have tracked over time.

New Paper: Diana Tracy Cohen, "Family-Friendly Las Vegas: An Analysis of Time and Space"

By David G. Schwartz on May 22, 2014 11:46 AM | Permalink

We have posted the latest in our Occasional Paper Series:

Paper 25: May 2014

Diana Tracy Cohen, "Family-Friendly Las Vegas: An Analysis of Time and Space"

ABSTRACT: This paper explores the rise and fall of the “family-friendly” Las Vegas marketing era. Through analysis of casino advertisements, internal and external building infrastructure, and qualitative in-depth interviews with industry insiders, this work investigates the city’s reinvention of the early 1990s. Key factors that set the stage for the emergence of targeted family marketing are identified, addressing why this advertising approach ultimately did not sustain. Unique marketing case studies are identified throughout.

View the paper here (pdf)

This is a great look at one of the most-debated Vegas questions--was the city ever really "family friendly?"

UNLV Gaming Podcast 60: Matias Karekallas

By David G. Schwartz on April 3, 2014 4:31 PM | Permalink

The latest UNLV Gaming Podcast is up:

60-April 3, 2014
Matias Karekallas
"The Ambivalent Images of Las Vegas in Popular Music"
In this 4/3 Gaming Research Colloquium talk, Karekallas discusses how Las Vegas is represented in popular music and the role of music in the portrayal of Las Vegas in popular culture, in place promotion, and in the endorsement of gambling.

Listen to the audio file (mp3)

View the flyer (pdf)

UNLV Gaming Podcast 58: Robert Miller

By David G. Schwartz on March 21, 2014 4:42 PM | Permalink

The latest UNLV Gaming Podcast is up:

58-March 21, 2014
Robert Miller
"Paradise of Spectacle: Imagining and Re-presenting Casino Resorts as Spaces of Luxury and Leisure in the Twentieth Century"
In this 3/21/14 Gaming Research Colloquium talk, Miller (Assistant Instructor and PhD Candidate in History, University of Kansas) examines how Las Vegas, Monte Carlo, Havana, and Macau each created spatial imaginaries that helped to anchor the cities as destinations centered around gambling. Each locale shares cosmopolitanism, luxury, and spectacle, allowing them to draw on a large cross-section of the public.

Listen to the audio file (mp3)

View the flyer (pdf)

Mid-Year Southern Nevada Report

By David G. Schwartz on August 1, 2013 2:59 PM | Permalink

In collaboration with Colliers Gaming, the Center for Gaming Research has produced a report summarizing the mid-year prospects for the gaming industry in Southern Nevada:

2013 Mid Year Report
With half of 2013 behind us, visitor volume appears to be holding steady, and gaming revenue is on track to show very solid improvement when compared to the past four years.

Look for more UNLV/Colliers work in the future. 

New Report: Las Vegas Casino Twitter Use

By David G. Schwartz on May 4, 2012 2:18 PM | Permalink
I've posted a new report:

Las Vegas Casino Twitter Use
May 2012 report with data on followers, frequency, and longevity of accounts 

This is a long-awaited follow-up on the pilot project from 2010, and the first collaboration with new Associate Analyst April Lin, who is the report's co-author. Here's the executive summary:

Nearly all Las Vegas casinos use Twitter. This report contains statistics on how long they've used the service for, how often

UNLV Gaming Podcast 30: Benjamin Min Han

By David G. Schwartz on March 24, 2011 4:32 PM | Permalink

March 24, 2011
Benjamin Min Han, Gaming Research Colloquium
"We're Right Next Door': Televisual Las Vegas in Cold War America."


Han, currently a graduate student in cinema studies at New York University, is looking at how television performances helped to shape perceptions of Las Vegas. Since World War II, Las Vegas has evolved into an entertainment capital of the world. While we often associate Las Vegas with gambling and casinos, many foreign ethnic talents arrived in the city to perform in hotels and nightclubs. These talented performers were instrumental in the development of televisual Las Vegas. This talk explores the migration of ethnic talent, and how such prominent Las Vegas entertainment business figures like Jack Entratter and Bill Willard envisioned transforming the city into a primary center of television production from the 1950s to 1970s.